Preserving artisanal know-how in the cavalry

For the needs of its service, the Republican Guard carries on the crafts of old that are necessary to maintain the cavalry’s and infantry’s equipment. Its master craftsmen continue to pass this know-how, this intangible cultural heritage, from generation to generation.

Saddlers have been responsible for maintaining military saddles and harnesses, the oldest dating from World War I and still used by the cavalry regiment. The high quality of the leathers and the traditional method of fabrication guarantee their strength in service and proper preservation.

The cavalry helmets of the model of the Empire’s cuirassiers include more than 80 steel or brass pieces riveted or welded on site. Their red or black mane is always made of natural horsehair.

The Republican Guard carries on the crafts of old that are necessary to maintain the cavalry’s and infantry’s equipment. Its master craftsmen continue to pass this know-how, this intangible cultural heritage, from generation to generation.

Armourers ensure maintenance of 1,300 1822-, 1845- and 1923-model swords used in the units. Natural corrosion or an occasional horse fall call for the use of various operations such as welding, furbishing and polishing, which require a sure eye and stable hand. Armourers are also capable of creating beech wood handles covered with leather and twisted brass.

Simultaneously engulfed in patient research, the Guard’s tailor-modeller also creates the old uniforms covering infantry and cavalry during the historical re-enactments they perform for the public.

The current collection includes 700 uniforms ranging the time of Saint Louis, Francois I, Louis XV, the French Revolution, the First Empire and the Restoration.

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